CURSOS DE TIBETANO (EN INGLÉS)

Continuing Beginning Colloquial Tibetan (Semester 4)

FACULTAD

Gerry Wiener

Nima Bhuti

This course is oriented toward beginning Tibetan-language students who are interested in furthering their connections to the language. It assumes some prior knowledge of colloquial Tibetan.

Lessons this summer will include classes on the following topics:

1) Time
2) Days of the week, dates, and months of the year
3) The four seasons
4) Location and the four directions
5) Parts of the body
6) Members of the family

Students will be conversing about these topics using short sentences and will train in responding to questions in conversations.

Prerequisites:

Students should know how to read basic Tibetan sentences aloud (but not necessarily understand their entire meaning). They should have some familiarity with verb tenses (past, present, and future), auxiliary verbs, essential and existential verbs including yin, min, red, ma red, yod med, ‘dug, mi ‘dug, yod red and yod ma red. Students should also have some familiarity with the basics of the locative, genitive, instrumental cases, and question words and particles.

Required Texts:

None. All material will be provided.

Continuing Intermediate Colloquial Tibetan (Semester 4)

FACULTAD

Gerry Wiener

Nima Bhuti

This course is for those students who already have some established grounding in colloquial Tibetan. The focus will be to gain further fluency in reading, speaking, and listening to Tibetan using the Central Tibetan dialect.

Required texts:

  • The Heart of Tibetan Language by Franziska Oertle, and its associated exercise book (print available from KTD’s Namse Bangdzo bookstore and ebook available from Tibetan Library). Once we complete Vol I, we plan to continue with Vol II and will provide students with the necessary material if it’s not available in print.

Prerequisites: Students should be familiar with the contents of the Heart of Tibetan Language Vol I up through at least Chapter 8 or equivalent.

Introduction to Tibetan Buddhist Literature (Beginning Semester 1)

FACULTAD

Mark Seibold

This course focuses on acquiring the knowledge and skills needed to read Buddhist literature—primarily liturgical and commentarial texts—in Tibetan. For this course we will study Khenpo Tsultrim Gyurme Rinpoche’s Opening the Door to Prajna, ཤེས་རབ་སྒོ་འབྱེད། which presents a graded introduction to the concepts and terminology to Buddhist doctrine and teachings. We will also engage in a detailed study of Tibetan grammar from the perspective of both classical and modern analyses. Using Khenpo Tsultrim Gyurme Rinpoche’s Opening the Door to Prajna, ཤེས་རབ་སྒོ་འབྱེད། as our primary text which presents a graded introduction to the concepts and terminology to Buddhist doctrine and teachings, our training in reading will start with simple phrases that build vocabulary and familiarity with common grammatical structures. As students gain experience, we will gradually read increasingly long and complex passages. Students will be introduced to the traditional discipline of jor-lo (sbyor klog) — “reading the connections.”

Prerequisites: Knowledge of the Tibetan alphabet, spelling rules, and a basic grasp of Tibetan grammar. Se pedirá a los estudiantes traducir un pasaje de tibetano a inglés para que el instructor pueda determinar su destreza. LAN500 or equivalent is recommended. Instructor’s permission is required (mseibold@nitarthainstitute.org)

Reading Tibetan Buddhist Literature (Intermediate Semester 1)

FACULTAD

Mark Seibold

This course is oriented towards reading Tibetan Buddhist texts and literature. We will use Tokmé Zangbo’s famous 37 Practices of a Bodhisattva (རྒྱལ་སྲེཨ་ལག་ལེན་སོ་བདུན་མ།) as the basis for developing familiarity with Tibetan grammar and developing reading skills. Se explicarán puntos gramaticales interesantes e importantes dentro del contexto de pasajes específicos. In addition, we will study grammar from an annotated commentarial translation of Kelsang Gyurmé’s རབ་གསལ་མེ་ལོང་།, The Clear Mirror. Opening and closing chants are done in Tibetan. Students are encouraged to practice reading aloud to learn the rhythms and feel of the phrasing of the language and train in the traditional discipline of jor-lo (sbyor klog) — “reading the connections.”

Prerequisites:
Students are asked to translate a short passage from Tibetan to English to help the instructor determine their proficiency. Se requiere el permiso del instructor.